City Wide Open Studios 2010

Artspace's 13th City-Wide Open Studios – from a few angles.

Loving Open Studios: Artists in the Alternative Space Edition

Loving Open Studios: Artists in the Alternative Space @ 196-212 College Street

Eric Litke

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT NEW HAVEN?

It’s not Hartford.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT OPEN STUDIOS?

It takes full advantage of the unique & active arts scene in New Haven.

Margaret Roleke

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT NEW HAVEN?

There is always a lot going on. It is fun, exciting, and you never know what’s going to happen.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT OPEN STUDIOS?

It’s a unique opportunity to connect with different artists & the general public and there is a really good feeling to the whole event.

Robert S. Greenberg

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT NEW HAVEN?

Its history.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT OPEN STUDIOS?

Advancing visual culture.

Kim Mikenis

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT NEW HAVEN?

People, places, things.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT OPEN STUDIOS?

Meeting new people, being inspired by others, letting people know about the kind of artwork I create.

Elvira E. Ormaechea

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT NEW HAVEN?

The British Museum! The resources, it’s so close to New York but not New York. The culture, the art, the people. It’s wonderful and so close to home.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT OPEN STUDIOS?

On the way to the bathroom you can have a tunnel art gallery. Anybody can show work. It exposes all the wonders from around us. Sharing the love.

Kevin Van Aelst

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT NEW HAVEN?

It’s pretty small, but there are still all sorts of things going on here.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT OPEN STUDIOS?

A few weekends where you can forget about everything except how great the artists & art are here.

Colin Burke

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT NEW HAVEN?

I’m new to the area but lived in Boston for many years. New Haven is walkable—like Cambridge. I love the architecture, food, art & being able to walk around. New Haven has it all! And history too!

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT OPEN STUDIOS?

At City Wide Open Studios you get lots of people, lots of questions, people interested in art & the process. It’s a good experience for artists to know what people want to know about the work or the process.

As an artist, you don’t have a lot of feedback from people who aren’t artists. Feedback is positive, a chance for people to see what happens and to see what engages people.

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Filed under: Alternative Space, arts, CWOS, Uncategorized, , , , , , , ,

SERA Salon: Social Experiments Relational Acts

This weekend at the Alternative Space, City-Wide Open Studios hosts SERA (Social Experiments Relational Acts) Salon, examining the notion of art as service – in a vacant, fully-outfitted nail salon.

Artspace has cleaned the salon, but left its original trappings – magazines, customer autographs, nail polish tubes, manicure tables and pedicure tables – intact. From 12 pm – 5 pm on Saturday, October 9, and Sunday, October 10, visitors will be able to participate in a series of site-specific experiments, developed by various artists and organized by Ted Efremoff.

One such experiment is “IMAGICURE: an imagination exchange for creative alternatives,” developed by Steven Dahlberg. In IMAGICURE, visitors are invited to to contribute an idea about how to infuse more creativity in education.  In his statement to Artspace, Dahlberg adds that, “A salon is inherently a place of social interaction, where ideas are exchanged and community is built….This experience explores creativity in service to self and the community.”

Dahlberg focuses on applied imagination in search of creative alternatives. He is interested in how creativity improves the well-being and flourishing of those who engage in it. He directed an international creativity conference and currently heads the International Centre for Creativity and Imagination.

The project also includes the relational act, WAIT.  WAIT engages its participants through a “Take-a-Number” ticket dispenser “Take-a-Number” ticket dispenser, and other permutations of symbolic place holders, that only exist to allow access to a future experience or object.  This is a relational act intended to discover, or at least approximate what we are waiting for?   What are the philosophical existential implications of  waiting? When do we wait? What does waiting feel like?

WAIT has been developed by John O’Donnell.  O’Donnell was conceived on Halloween, born on his father’s birthday, and raised in Montana. He lives and works in Connecticut. He has exhibited at the Chelsea Art Museum, the International Print Center in New York, and the Seoul Museum of Art in Korea. John creates installations, videos, performances, prints and works on paper.

Also participating are PRAXIS, the joint project of Delia Bajo and Brainard Carey.  Among many other notable achievements and innovations, the pair have previously participated in the Whitney Biennial.

Please join us this weekend to celebrate this unique event.  Social Experiments and Relational Acts await you…

 

Photos by Adi Segal, for Artspace.  More can be found here….

Filed under: Alternative Space, arts, CWOS, new haven

Artists participating in the Alternative Space!


Tomoko Abe
Janice Barnish
Gene Beery
Barry Braman
Colin Burke
Mark Burns
Eileen Carey
Melanie Carr Eveleth
Dave Coon
Sean Corvino
Chris Cozzi
Steve Dahlberg
Robert Davis
Marion Doherty
Lanse Dowdell
Ted Efremoff
Jessica Fazzini
Rob Greenberg
Barbara Hocker
Marion Hunt
Aileen Ishmael
Eric Iannucci
Richard Kallweit
Kelly Kapfer
Harvey Koizim
Lauren Laudano
Eric Lidtke
Esdras Lubin
Kim Mikenis
Albert Municino
Tim Nikiforuk
John O’Donnell
Rebecca Paker
Rob Parkman
Margaret Rolecke
Tom Regner
Mark Regni
Martha Savage
Alyssa Scioritina
Cris Shirley
Robert Sibold
Suzan Shutan
Krys Swiattek
Kevin VanAelst 

Plus a team of Coop HS Students!

Filed under: Alternative Space, arts, CWOS, new haven

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